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If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

12

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link=”http://www.themagpi.com/#” style=”download”]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

11

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link=”http://www.themagpi.com/#” style=”download”]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

10

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link=”http://www.themagpi.com/#” style=”download”]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

magpi 9

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link=”http://www.themagpi.com/#” style=”download”]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

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Back in June we told you about the new Node cases from Fractal Design. We got our hands on the Node 304 case and it’s time for our review.

CDW Review of the Fractal Design Node 304 Computer Case - 6

The Node 304 Case

Here is how Fractal Design describe the Node 304:

The Node 304 is the latest compact computer chassis from Fractal Design featuring a unique modular interior for outstanding configurability.

The Node 304 accommodates up to six hard drives. Unused mounting brackets can removed to allow for long graphic cards, additional airflow or more space for organizing cables. Additionally, it is equipped with three hydraulic bearing fans, easy-to-clean air filters in all intakes and two front USB 3.0 ports.

Featuring hybrid functionality, the Node 304 case is ideally used as a cool-running file server, a stylish and quiet home theatre PC or a powerful gaming system highlighting minimalistic and stunning Scandinavian design and maximum functionality.

Who Are Fractal Design?

This is how Fractal Design describe themselves:

The concept – Design

The concept of Fractal Design is to provide products with an extraordinary design level, without compromising the important factors of quality, functionality and pricing. The computer of today has come to play a central role in most people’s home, creating a demand for appealing design of the computer itself and its accessories.
Our main product areas are computer enclosures, power supplies, cooling, and Media Center-products, such as Home Theatre-enclosures, keyboards and remote controls.

Designed and engineered in Sweden

All Fractal Design products have been thoroughly designed, tested and specified in our Swedish head quarter. The well known ideas of Scandinavian design can be found through all of our products; a minimalistic but yet striking design – less is more.

Visions and goals

Our vision is to have a constant, healthy growth together with our partners worldwide. Our goal is to be widely recognized for our designed products and to have them available in all major market regions within EU and US. We should be a good alternative to the already established retail brands of today. It’s of great importance for us that our partners understand the values of Fractal Design, therefore we are putting great effort into choosing the right partners from the start. We will work actively to maintain sales territories and profitable business for our partners.

The way to reach our goals

In the competitive market of today, it’s not enough to just provide excellent products. Regular and well planned marketing activities in close cooperation with the channel and the available media, are key points to succeed. We are well experienced in marketing brands in the IT business, and we will use this to create efficient marketing tools – to gain a bigger market share and good earning possibilities for our channel.

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If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

MagPi8

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link=”http://www.themagpi.com/#” style=”download”]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

magpi 7

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link=”http://www.themagpi.com/#” style=”download”]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you are a fan of RISC OS then you will be happy to hear that you can now run RISC OS on your Raspberry Pi with RISC OS Pi.

sony-rasp-pi_thumb3

This is what was posted:

RISC OS Open are very pleased to announce the official release of RISC OS for the Raspberry Pi, “RISC OS Pi”. This is a watershed moment for RISC OS and represents the culmination of many months of hard work from a whole community of developers, testers and other contributors. It also means the Raspberry Pi can now boast support for the quick, compact, original ARM-based operating system.

This is the first ‘official’ release of RISC OS for the Raspberry Pi. It is intended to be programmed onto an SD card (2GB or larger) and can be downloaded free from the Raspberry Pi download site, as an SD card image or as a torrent. Alternatively, you can buy a specially-branded SD card already programmed and tested direct from RISC OS Open.

Eben Upton, from the Raspberry Pi Foundation, had the following to say about the RISC OS release: “Having spent a lot of time in my youth pining over Acorn Archimedes and RiscPC products, it’s a great moment for me personally to see an evolved version of the original ARM operating system brought to the Raspberry Pi. From the Foundation’s point of view, we welcome the arrival of an alternative desktop environment, offering a rich suite of applications, and with BBC BASIC only a few keystrokes away.”

Steve Revill, from RISC OS Open, added: “We’re proud and excited to have achieved this milestone in the development of RISC OS. It’s so good to see some great British software engineering to complement the fantastic British Raspberry Pi hardware.”

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

Have you ordered one? Let us know if you get yours and what you do with it.

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If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

page_1_thumb_large

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link=”http://www.themagpi.com/#” style=”download”]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you want to make your Raspberry Pi run faster you need Turbo Mode.If you want to make your Raspberry Pi run faster you need Turbo Mode.

CDW---2nd-London-Raspberry-Jam---12_

This is what was posted on the Raspberry Pi blog by Eben (its only the start of the article so do click and read the full thing):

Since launch, we’ve supported overclocking and overvolting your Raspberry Pi by editing config.txt. Overvolting provided more overclocking headroom, but voided your warranty because we were concerned it would decrease the lifetime of the SoC; we set a sticky bit inside BCM2835 to allow us to spot boards which have been overvolted.

We’ve been doing a lot of work to understand the impact of voltage and temperature on lifetime, and are now able to offer a “turbo mode”, which dynamically enables overclock and overvolt under the control of a cpufreq driver, without affecting your warranty. We are happy that the combination of only applying turbo when busy, and limiting turbo when the BCM2835′s internal temperature reaches 85°C, means there will be no measurable reduction in the lifetime of your Raspberry Pi.

You can now choose from one of five overclock presets in raspi-config, the highest of which runs the ARM at 1GHz. The level of stable overclock you can achieve will depend on your specific Pi and on the quality of your power supply; we suggest that Quake 3 is a good stress test for checking if a particular level is completely stable. If you choose too high an overclock, your Pi may fail to boot, in which case holding down the shift key during boot up will disable the overclock for that boot, allowing you to select a lower level.

What does this mean? Comparing the new image with 1GHz turbo enabled, against the previous image at 700MHz, nbench reports 52% faster on integer, 64% faster on floating point and 55% faster on memory.

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/07/15/a-slice-of-raspberry-pi-with-the-foundation-at-the-cambridge-raspberryjam/”]Check out what happened at the Q&A session with the Raspberry Pi Foundation[/button]

Have you tried Turbo Mode yet? Have you noticed a significant difference? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

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Back in July we told you that Fractal Design had announced a new case – the Define R4. Shortly after we got our hands-on one and it’s time for our review.

CDW review of the Fractal Design Define R4 Computer Case - 3

The Define R4 Case

Here is how Fractal Design describe the Define R4:

The Fractal Design Define R4 is the latest in the Define Series of computer cases offering minimalistic and stunning Scandinavian design fused with maximum sound reduction, configurability and functionality.

The Define R4 side and front door panels are fitted with dense, sound-absorbing material making it a benchmark for noise reduction. Moreover, the Define R4 accommodates up to 8 HDDs, all modern graphics card sizes, and multiple ventilation options – including two standard Silent Series R2 hydraulic bearing fans – to keep internal components at optimal temperatures.

For ultimate functionality, the Define R4 features a front interface with USB 3.0 and an integrated three-speed fan controller behind the front panel door.

Who Are Fractal Design?

This is how Fractal Design describe themselves:

The concept – Design

The concept of Fractal Design is to provide products with an extraordinary design level, without compromising the important factors of quality, functionality and pricing. The computer of today has come to play a central role in most people’s home, creating a demand for appealing design of the computer itself and its accessories.
Our main product areas are computer enclosures, power supplies, cooling, and Media Center-products, such as Home Theatre-enclosures, keyboards and remote controls.

Designed and engineered in Sweden

All Fractal Design products have been thoroughly designed, tested and specified in our Swedish head quarter. The well known ideas of Scandinavian design can be found through all of our products; a minimalistic but yet striking design – less is more.

Visions and goals

Our vision is to have a constant, healthy growth together with our partners worldwide. Our goal is to be widely recognized for our designed products and to have them available in all major market regions within EU and US. We should be a good alternative to the already established retail brands of today. It’s of great importance for us that our partners understand the values of Fractal Design, therefore we are putting great effort into choosing the right partners from the start. We will work actively to maintain sales territories and profitable business for our partners.

The way to reach our goals

In the competitive market of today, it’s not enough to just provide excellent products. Regular and well planned marketing activities in close cooperation with the channel and the available media, are key points to succeed. We are well experienced in marketing brands in the IT business, and we will use this to create efficient marketing tools – to gain a bigger market share and good earning possibilities for our channel.

Great news for us Brits – the Raspberry Pi is now officially made in the UK!

sony-rasp-pi

This is what Liz posted:

If you’ve been following us for a while, you’ll remember the time last year when we had to make the decision to manufacture the Raspberry Pi in China. The Raspberry Pi is a British enterprise, and as well as improving things in the computing industry’s future here by educating kids, we wanted to improve things in the present too, by actually doing our manufacture here in the UK.

Last year, when nobody had heard of the Raspberry Pi, we had been unable to find a British manufacturer whose prices per unit (especially at a point where we were thinking of sales in the tens of thousands, not the hundreds of thousands you’re seeing now) would work for us, and who believed that the project would be enough of a success for them to risk line space for us. There was just no way to make the Raspberry Pi in the UK and keep the price at $25 for the Model A (which will be released before the end of the year at the promised price) and $35 for the Model B.

Happily, things change.

Back at the beginning of April, Eben and I paid a visit to Sony’s UK manufacturing plant in Pencoed, South Wales. Several meetings, a factory tour, a lot of phone calls, some PowerPoint and sandwiches, and an up-close-and-personal with a wave soldering machine later, we were able to introduce our manufacturing and distributing partners to Sony’s Welsh facility, where, as well as making Sony products, Sony’s team undertakes contract electronic manufacture (CEM). It’s an incredibly impressive affair; the quietest, pleasantest plant I’ve ever been in, all comfortable lighting, ergonomic workspaces, cool air and relaxed staff. Sony’s quality control system is legendary, their ability to manufacture fast and cleanly is superb, and they’ve already invested in adding PoP (Package on Package – the fiddly stuff where the Broadcom chip at the heart of the Raspberry Pi is stacked beneath the RAM chip) hardware manufacture ability and expansion capability just for us. They’re also able to take on the huge task (currently undertaken by RS and Farnell) of ensuring the parts used are sourced ethically and to the highest ecological standards – every component has to pass standard compliance via Sony’s Green Management programme.

The upshot of all this? Element14/Premier Farnell have made the decision to move the bulk of their Raspberry Pi manufacture to South Wales. Moving manufacture like this is an enormous undertaking; from the start of the process, it’s taken us (especially Pete), Farnell and Sony nearly six months to get all our respective ducks in a row. The initial contract will see the Pencoed plant producing 30,000 Raspberry Pis a month, and creating around 30 new jobs.

How do you know if you’ve got a UK-made board? Easy. Look next to the power jack; you’ll see the words “Made in the UK”. We couldn’t be prouder.

That is great news, and even better that it creates 30 new jobs in the UK – so well done guys!

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

Have you ordered one? Let us know if you get yours and what you do with it.

Details of the upcoming Raspberry Pi board revision have been released – read on for details.

CDW---2nd-London-Raspberry-Jam---12_

This is what was posted on the Raspberry Pi blog:

Update: A lot of people are asking when revision 2.0 boards will appear in the wild. They’ll be filtering out over the next month as the last stocks of the revision 1.0 at each distributor and in each geography are exhausted. I’m aware of at least one person who has received a revision 2.0 board already (from Farnell, in the UK).

We don’t believe that the changes are large enough to make it worth “holding on” for revision 2.0, unless you have a specific requirement to add an audio codec or you need mounting holes for some industrial application.

In the six months since we launched Raspberry Pi, we’ve received a lot of feedback about the original board design. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be gradually rolling out a new revision 2.0 PCB which incorporates some of the most popular suggestions. You can determine which board revision you have by typing cat /proc/cpuinfo at the command line and looking up the hardware revision code in the following table:

MODEL AND REVISION    CODE(S)
Model B Revision 1.0    2
Model B Revision 1.0 + ECN0001 (no fuses, D14 removed)    3
Model B Revision 2.0    4, 5, 6
There has been a small change to the GPIO pin out of revision 2.0, to add ARM JTAG support and to present a different I2C peripheral from that which is (heavily) used on the camera interface. Users wishing to produce portable GPIO code should either avoid using the these pins, or add code to check the board revision and behave appropriately.

Reset

A reset circuit has been implemented, although in the standard build the required header is not fitted. Users wishing to use this circuit should fit an appropriate header to P6. Shorting P6 pin 1 to P6 pin 2 will cause the BCM2835 to reset.

USB Output Power

The resetable fuses protecting the USB outputs have been removed. This feature was implemented on some later revision 1.0 PCBs by replacing the fuses with links; revision 2.0 permanently implements this modification. It is now possible to reliably power the RPI from a USB hub that back feeds power, but it is important that the chosen hub cannot supply more than 2.5A under fault conditions.

JTAG Debug Support

Two GPIO pins have been interchanged to allow a missing debug signal (ARM_TMS) to appear on P1 pin 13.

Originally the connections were:

CAM_GPIO [BCM2835/GPIO27] routed to S5 pin 11
GPIO_GEN2 [BCM2835/GPIO21] routed to P1 pin 13
The new connections are:

CAM_GPIO [BCM2835/GPIO21] routed to S5 pin 11
GPIO_GEN2 [BCM2835/GPIO27] routed to P1 pin 13
I2C Support on P1/P6

The primary and secondary I2C channels have been reversed.

Originally the connections were:

SCL0 [BCM2835/GPIO1] routed to P1 pin 5
SDA0 [BCM2835/GPIO0] routed to P1 pin 3
SCL1 [BCM2835/GPIO3] routed to S5 pin 13
SDA1 [BCM2835/GPIO2] routed to S5 pin 14
The new connections are:

SCL0 [BCM2835/GPIO1] routed to S5 pin 13
SDA0 [BCM2835/GPIO0] routed to S5 pin 14
SCL1 [BCM2835/GPIO3] routed to P1 pin 5
SDA1 [BCM2835/GPIO2] routed to P1 pin 3
Version Identification Links

The four GPIO signals originally used for version identification have been removed. These were never read by the system software and were redundant.

Additional I/O Expansion

To utilise GPIO signals released by the removal of the version identification links, a new connector site P5 has been added. This carries the four GPIO signals [BCM2835/GPIO28 – BCM2835/GPIO31] named GPIO7 – GPIO10 respectively, along with +5V0, +3V3 and two 0V. Currently this connector is not populated.

This GPIO allocation provides access to one of:

SDA0, SCL0 (Operating independently of P1 SDA1, SCL1); or
PCM_CLK, PCM_FS, PCM_DIN, PCM_DOUT or I2S; or
Four GPIO signals.
This connector is intended to be a suitable attachment point for third-party clock and audio codec boards, and is pinned to be mounted (ideally) on the underside due to connector clash. Pin 1 is marked with the square pad (top left – looking from the top).

+5V0 Leakage from HDMI

Some users have found that connecting an unpowered Raspberry Pi to an HDMI television interferes with the correct operation of CEC for other connected devices. This was fixed on some later revision 1.0 PCBs by removing the ESD protection diode D14; revision 2.0 fixes this issue by connecting the top side of the diode to +5V0_HDMI.

SMSC +1V8

The SMSC 1V8 power has been disconnected from the system supply.

Mounting Holes!

Two 2.5mm (drilled 2.9mm for M2.5 screw) non plated mounting holes have been provided to assist with ATE test mounting. Positions of these holes relative to the bottom left of the PCB (Power Input Corner) are:

Corner: 0.0mm,0.0mm
First Mount: 25.5mm,18.0mm
Second Mount: 80.1mm, 43.6mm
Warning: If used to permanently mount the PCB – do not over tighten screws or drill out to fit larger screws, as this will lead to damage to the PCB.

LED Marking

Two minor changes have been made to the silk screen:

D9 (Yellow LED) graphic changed from the incorrect 10M to 100
D5 (Green LED) graphic changed from OK to ACT (Activity)

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/07/15/a-slice-of-raspberry-pi-with-the-foundation-at-the-cambridge-raspberryjam/”]Check out what happened at the Q&A session with the Raspberry Pi Foundation[/button]

Let us know if you get a revision 2 board by leaving a comment below.

Raspbmc for Raspberry Pi has just been updated again, this time with PVR support, easy codec installation and more.

CDW---The-Beeb--30-Event-037_thumb1_[1]

This is what was posted:

A few days ago I announced MPEG2 hardware decoding support for the Raspberry Pi. Prior to this announcement, there was little point in pushing out a PVR build, as only H264 broadcasts would be playable. Now we’ve got an MPEG2 decoder, it seems fitting to allow PVR support.This PVR build is custom and I have implemented it into the Raspberry Pi XBMC branch itself, so it is technically an unsupported platform. Thanks to empat0 for OMXPlayer patches. Don’t expect a lot of support on this for now!

What does PVR offer?

  • You can view your TV schedule, watch TV channels and schedule recordings.
  • Works with TVHeadend backend, MythTV, yaVDR, MediaPortal and will soon work with ForTheRecord
  • Works with IPTV / DVB-T (known as Freeview in the UK), and DVB-S (satellite), and in some regions DVB-C (cable).

This means you can now watch live TV on any Pi from a single antenna / dish / cable connection.

Easy codec installation

Now it’s easier than ever to enter your license keys you got from the foundation as you can do it right from the Raspbmc Settings addon.

New XBMC release

This PVR functionality is now available in the form of a new XBMC update. This update brings bug fixes and enhancements as well. To get this functionality, you need to install it from the Nightly build list in the Raspbmc Settings addon. It’s being kept separate from the standard XBMC Raspbmc offers for reasons of stability and maintainability.

Known issue: CEC

CEC support is broken in this build. I can resolve this later, but haven’t had much time to look at it as I’m a little busy for now working on the next release.

Many thanks and enjoy

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/” style=”info”]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link=”http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/” color=”silver”]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

Have you ordered one? Let us know if you get yours and what you do with it.

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