computer

We are big fans of Fractal Design and we recently got our hands on the new Node 605 case and so it’s time for our review.

CDW Review of the Fractal Design Node 605 computer case - 14

The Node 605 Case

Here is how Fractal Design describe the Node 605:

The Node 605 highlights a minimalistic, sleek Scandinavian appeal which is designed to integrate into your home theatre equipment.

Featuring a stunning exterior appearance accompanied by a modern, black interior with sound and vibration dampening materials, the Fractal Design Node 605 supports a full ATX motherboard as well as a graphics card up to 280mm in length.

Cleverly hidden behind the access panel on the solid 8mm thick aluminum front panel are two USB 3.0 ports, a FireWire port and a multi-format card reader for multiple formats.

Who Are Fractal Design?

This is how Fractal Design describe themselves:

The concept – Design

The concept of Fractal Design is to provide products with an extraordinary design level, without compromising the important factors of quality, functionality and pricing. The computer of today has come to play a central role in most people’s home, creating a demand for appealing design of the computer itself and its accessories.
Our main product areas are computer enclosures, power supplies, cooling, and Media Center-products, such as Home Theatre-enclosures, keyboards and remote controls.

Designed and engineered in Sweden

All Fractal Design products have been thoroughly designed, tested and specified in our Swedish head quarter. The well known ideas of Scandinavian design can be found through all of our products; a minimalistic but yet striking design – less is more.

Visions and goals

Our vision is to have a constant, healthy growth together with our partners worldwide. Our goal is to be widely recognized for our designed products and to have them available in all major market regions within EU and US. We should be a good alternative to the already established retail brands of today. It’s of great importance for us that our partners understand the values of Fractal Design, therefore we are putting great effort into choosing the right partners from the start. We will work actively to maintain sales territories and profitable business for our partners.

The way to reach our goals

In the competitive market of today, it’s not enough to just provide excellent products. Regular and well planned marketing activities in close cooperation with the channel and the available media, are key points to succeed. We are well experienced in marketing brands in the IT business, and we will use this to create efficient marketing tools – to gain a bigger market share and good earning possibilities for our channel.

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

13

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

0

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

12

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

11

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

10

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

magpi 9

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

2

Back in June we told you about the new Node cases from Fractal Design. We got our hands on the Node 304 case and it’s time for our review.

CDW Review of the Fractal Design Node 304 Computer Case - 6

The Node 304 Case

Here is how Fractal Design describe the Node 304:

The Node 304 is the latest compact computer chassis from Fractal Design featuring a unique modular interior for outstanding configurability.

The Node 304 accommodates up to six hard drives. Unused mounting brackets can removed to allow for long graphic cards, additional airflow or more space for organizing cables. Additionally, it is equipped with three hydraulic bearing fans, easy-to-clean air filters in all intakes and two front USB 3.0 ports.

Featuring hybrid functionality, the Node 304 case is ideally used as a cool-running file server, a stylish and quiet home theatre PC or a powerful gaming system highlighting minimalistic and stunning Scandinavian design and maximum functionality.

Who Are Fractal Design?

This is how Fractal Design describe themselves:

The concept – Design

The concept of Fractal Design is to provide products with an extraordinary design level, without compromising the important factors of quality, functionality and pricing. The computer of today has come to play a central role in most people’s home, creating a demand for appealing design of the computer itself and its accessories.
Our main product areas are computer enclosures, power supplies, cooling, and Media Center-products, such as Home Theatre-enclosures, keyboards and remote controls.

Designed and engineered in Sweden

All Fractal Design products have been thoroughly designed, tested and specified in our Swedish head quarter. The well known ideas of Scandinavian design can be found through all of our products; a minimalistic but yet striking design – less is more.

Visions and goals

Our vision is to have a constant, healthy growth together with our partners worldwide. Our goal is to be widely recognized for our designed products and to have them available in all major market regions within EU and US. We should be a good alternative to the already established retail brands of today. It’s of great importance for us that our partners understand the values of Fractal Design, therefore we are putting great effort into choosing the right partners from the start. We will work actively to maintain sales territories and profitable business for our partners.

The way to reach our goals

In the competitive market of today, it’s not enough to just provide excellent products. Regular and well planned marketing activities in close cooperation with the channel and the available media, are key points to succeed. We are well experienced in marketing brands in the IT business, and we will use this to create efficient marketing tools – to gain a bigger market share and good earning possibilities for our channel.

0

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

MagPi8

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

magpi 7

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you are a fan of RISC OS then you will be happy to hear that you can now run RISC OS on your Raspberry Pi with RISC OS Pi.

sony-rasp-pi_thumb3

This is what was posted:

RISC OS Open are very pleased to announce the official release of RISC OS for the Raspberry Pi, “RISC OS Pi”. This is a watershed moment for RISC OS and represents the culmination of many months of hard work from a whole community of developers, testers and other contributors. It also means the Raspberry Pi can now boast support for the quick, compact, original ARM-based operating system.

This is the first ‘official’ release of RISC OS for the Raspberry Pi. It is intended to be programmed onto an SD card (2GB or larger) and can be downloaded free from the Raspberry Pi download site, as an SD card image or as a torrent. Alternatively, you can buy a specially-branded SD card already programmed and tested direct from RISC OS Open.

Eben Upton, from the Raspberry Pi Foundation, had the following to say about the RISC OS release: “Having spent a lot of time in my youth pining over Acorn Archimedes and RiscPC products, it’s a great moment for me personally to see an evolved version of the original ARM operating system brought to the Raspberry Pi. From the Foundation’s point of view, we welcome the arrival of an alternative desktop environment, offering a rich suite of applications, and with BBC BASIC only a few keystrokes away.”

Steve Revill, from RISC OS Open, added: “We’re proud and excited to have achieved this milestone in the development of RISC OS. It’s so good to see some great British software engineering to complement the fantastic British Raspberry Pi hardware.”

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

Have you ordered one? Let us know if you get yours and what you do with it.

0

If you have, or are interested in the Raspberry Pi, then you might want to download the new issue of The MagPi digital magazine.

page_1_thumb_large

This is how the Raspberry Pi guys describe the magazine:

The MagPi, a free online magazine dedicated to the Raspberry Pi, whose first issue was released a few days ago, is a perfect example of that. It’s been put together entirely by volunteers, guided by Ash Stone, Jason “Jaseman” Davies, Meltwater and other names you may recognise from the forums and comments on this site. I was broadly aware they were up to something, but I was amazed at the scope of what they sent me to look at earlier in the week, and I’ve been really, really impressed by the first issue. There are Debian and Puppy guides, articles on computing history, ideas for robotics projects, tutorials in Scratch and Python (with code you can type in yourself, just like in the good old days), features about the Raspberry Pi itself, and other goodies to dig into. I really can’t recommend it enough, and if you haven’t been lucky enough to get to the head of the queue, you don’t need a Raspberry Pi to find it useful (you might actually find the magazine good preparation before yours arrives).

It is a really interesting read – so go download it today, and let us know what you think!

[button link="http://www.themagpi.com/#" style="download"]Download the new issue of The MagPi here[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/20/eben-upton-talks-raspberry-pi/" style="info"]Check out the videos we made with Eben Upton[/button]

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/05/26/unboxing-the-raspberry-pi/" color="silver"]Check out our unboxing of our Raspberry Pi[/button]

If you want to make your Raspberry Pi run faster you need Turbo Mode.If you want to make your Raspberry Pi run faster you need Turbo Mode.

CDW---2nd-London-Raspberry-Jam---12_

This is what was posted on the Raspberry Pi blog by Eben (its only the start of the article so do click and read the full thing):

Since launch, we’ve supported overclocking and overvolting your Raspberry Pi by editing config.txt. Overvolting provided more overclocking headroom, but voided your warranty because we were concerned it would decrease the lifetime of the SoC; we set a sticky bit inside BCM2835 to allow us to spot boards which have been overvolted.

We’ve been doing a lot of work to understand the impact of voltage and temperature on lifetime, and are now able to offer a “turbo mode”, which dynamically enables overclock and overvolt under the control of a cpufreq driver, without affecting your warranty. We are happy that the combination of only applying turbo when busy, and limiting turbo when the BCM2835′s internal temperature reaches 85°C, means there will be no measurable reduction in the lifetime of your Raspberry Pi.

You can now choose from one of five overclock presets in raspi-config, the highest of which runs the ARM at 1GHz. The level of stable overclock you can achieve will depend on your specific Pi and on the quality of your power supply; we suggest that Quake 3 is a good stress test for checking if a particular level is completely stable. If you choose too high an overclock, your Pi may fail to boot, in which case holding down the shift key during boot up will disable the overclock for that boot, allowing you to select a lower level.

What does this mean? Comparing the new image with 1GHz turbo enabled, against the previous image at 700MHz, nbench reports 52% faster on integer, 64% faster on floating point and 55% faster on memory.

[button link="http://connecteddigitalworld.com/2012/07/15/a-slice-of-raspberry-pi-with-the-foundation-at-the-cambridge-raspberryjam/"]Check out what happened at the Q&A session with the Raspberry Pi Foundation[/button]

Have you tried Turbo Mode yet? Have you noticed a significant difference? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

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